Every 7 Minutes Someone Suffers a DVT!

“Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) doesn’t get a whole lot of attention; but it’s actually a fairly common condition…  It occurs in one or two per 1,000 each year – roughly the same rate as heart attack and stroke… 

 

“Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) doesn’t get a whole lot of attention; but it’s actually a fairly common condition… It occurs in one or two per 1,000 each year – roughly the same rate as heart attack and stroke…

It’s always a shock when it occurs to a young healthy individual,” Dr. Alan Bell, of the Thrombosis Interest Group of Canada tells Canada AM.

This DVT got a whole lot of attention because the patient was so young and he was a healthy. An all night video game session turned deadly, for the 20-year-old Christopher Staniforth, from the United Kingdom in 2011. Chris simply woke up, collapsed and died.

His autopsy found that a blood clot had travelled to his lungs after forming in the veins of his leg (DVT).

I his interview with Canada AM, David Staniforth, Chris’s father explained that he was shocked because his son was otherwise healthy. He furthermore had no idea that sitting in one spot for a long period of time puts one at risk of DVT.

Dr. Alan Bell with the Thrombosis Interest Group of Canada told Canada AM; “While deep vein thrombosis doesn’t get a whole lot of attention; it’s actually a fairly common condition.

DVT occurs in one or two per 1,000 per year – roughly the same rate as heart attack and stroke. However, it’s always a shock when it occurs to a young healthy individual”.

Clots can strike anyone of any age.

Bell further reports: “There are three things that put one at risk of deep vein thrombosis: Immobilization or stasis of the blood caused by sitting, trauma to blood vessels, such as during a break to the leg, and conditions, such as inherited blood conditions, pregnancy or cancer.”

Wearing Gradient Compression Socks is a well known and non-invasive prevention method to use when sitting at your computer or gaming system.

Sources:

Canada AM

Dr. Alan Bell; Thrombosis Interest Group of Canada

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